HipHopWired Featured Video
CLOSE
Celebrity Sightings In New York City - March 25, 2021

Source: Bobby Bank / Getty

Well, we officially have our first Black Captain America coming to the big screen in Captain America 4, but will we also get our first Black Superman too?

After months of rumors that Michael B. Jordan was going to be fitted for the blue suit and red cape, the man who once moonlighted as the Human Torch in the Marvel universe addressed the rumors and had an interesting take on the matter.

In an in-depth interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Jordan threw cold water on the rumors that he’d be the new Black Man of Steel in Ta-Nehisi Coates upcoming Superman reboot which is rumored to feature an African-American lead.

“It’s smart of DC to grab Ta-Nehisi to go ahead and adapt that project,” says Jordan. “He’s incredibly talented. It’s going to be worth checking out. I’m flattered that people have me in that conversation. It’s definitely a compliment, but I’m just watching on this one.”

Damnit, MBJ! Don’t you know how many Black kids would see that movie and resurrect the term “I wanna be like Mike”!?

But don’t think it’s because he has a problem with taking on a role that’s historically been filled by white men. Michael B. Jordan is in fact the first Black actor to be the lead in a Tom Clancy novel turned film, Without Remorse, which is set to debut on Amazon Prime this Friday (April 30).

Starring as Navy Seal, John Kelly a.k.a. John Clark, Jordan will be out to avenge the murder of his wife only to get himself involved in a larger conspiracy along the way. Illuminati! Nah, we just kiddin.’

Jordan is the first Black actor to take on this role, previously played by Willem Dafoe (1994’s Clear and Present Danger) and Liev Schreiber (2002’sThe Sum of All Fears). 

Jordan knows this a big step forward not just in his career, but for the Black community who look at these roles which were initially made for white men and feel it’s out of their reach.

“It’s important for people to see themselves in roles that they normally wouldn’t see,” says Jordan. “What that does to the next generation, to a kid or somebody that didn’t think that is something that they could achieve — now they’re thinking about it and daydreaming about it.”

We still waiting on that first Black James Bond, by the way. Just sayin.’

Photo: Getty

MORE FROM HIP-HOP WIRED