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Bob McCulloch, the St. Louis County District Attorney overseeing the Michael “Mike” Brown shooting case in Ferguson, claims he knew some witnesses were lying. In an interview, McColluch claimed he knew some of the witnesses lied but allowed their testimony anyway.

Last Friday (Dec. 19), McCulloch appeared on radio station KTRS 550 where he shared publicly that he knew witnesses lied under oath. This comes after a recent The Smoking Gun article where one witness, known as “Witness 40,” was shown to be a liar and was most likely nowhere near Ferguson the day Brown was shot and killed by Darren Wilson.

More from Buzzfeed:

KTRS: Why did you allow people to testify in front of the grand jury in which you knew their information was either flat-out wrong, or flat-out lying, or just weren’t telling the truth?

McCulloch: Well, early on, I decided that anyone who claimed to have witnessed anything was going to be presented to the grand jury.

And I knew that no matter how I handled it, there would be criticism of it. So if I didn’t put those witnesses on, then we’d be discussing now why I didn’t put those witnesses on. Even though their statements were not accurate.

So my determination was to put everybody on and let the grand jurors assess their credibility, which they did. This grand jury poured their hearts and souls into this. It was a very emotional few months for them. It took a lot of them.

McCulloch added that he has no intentions of pursuing charges against those who lied under oath, although some experts say that he does have the choice to do so. By McCulloch’s statements, he said his intentions were to put everything tied to the Ferguson case out there in front of the grand jury regardless of it were true or not.

The testimonies offered were what his office hoped the grand jury would use to determine what actually happened on that fateful August day.

Listen to McCulloch’s interview with KTRS 550 below.

[St. Louis Post-Dispatch]

Photo: MSNBC

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