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As we inch closer and closer to the 2016 presidential election, Hip-Hop’s biggest voices are starting to declare what candidates they will, or won’t, be supporting. Chance The Rapper is with Hillary Clinton.

The Chicago rapper revealed his choice of candidate in an interview with Billboard Magazine.

Chance says:

“Hillary Clinton, by far. Not to sound selfish, but she’s from Chicago so I would hope that she’d be engaged in our city’s current troubles and needs. She has a certain sincerity that’s hidden by the media. I’m not sure if it’s because she’s a woman or because Donald Trump just has a stronghold on the media at this time, but she’s unfairly treated. I can’t really speak on her policies but I feel a certain connection to Hillary Clinton that’s just not there with Donald Trump.”

Chance’s stance may remind you of the classic Dave Chappelle joke when he talked about how he didn’t look at presidential candidate’s actual policies, but based his decision off of their character.

You have to respect Chance’s honesty here, because most voters probably make their choices off a feeling as well. But is this the way to vote in 2016? Granted, it is somewhat assuring to know that Clinton is against mass incarceration and for investing resources in poor communities that are susceptible to crime, but is there really a “connection” with people who have backgrounds similar to Chance?

Yes, we have seen Hillary attempt to make connections by appearing on The Breakfast Club, at BET’s Black Girls Rock, doing voter registration drives with Pusha T and doing “interviews” with Mary J. Blige. All of which are more than what Trump and his “Black folks, what do you have to lose” strategy has attempted. But has she actually succeeded in making a real connection with Black voters? Or is it a case of Black people simply not voting for Trump?

Check out what some of your favorite rappers had to say when we asked them if they were voting for Clinton or Trump below.

Photo: WENN.com

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