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Facebook is looking to put a different spin on the annoying but necessary captcha system that asks users to identify themselves. Instead of typing in a random series of numbers, Facebook may require you to upload a selfie.

As first reported by Wired, Facebook may soon request a photo of yourself to prove you are not a bot. According to a tweet accompanied by a screenshot, they are already testing the new method.  In the prompt, it asks users to “Please upload a photo of yourself that clearly shows your face. We’ll check it and then permanently delete it from our servers.”

facebook selfie

Interesting…

According to Wired, Facebook has been using or testing this new method since April, several users posted on Reddit about the selfie prompt coming up. Now, of course, the idea having to take a photo of yourself and sending it to Facebook is cringeworthy. The company in the prompt states they will permanently delete the photo from their servers after it is checked.

Keep in mind that Facebook already has a ton of information on you already in the form of photos, statuses, and messenger posts. So a selfie should be the least of your worries honestly. Oh, and your fancy iPhone X also uses facial recognition technology already so this new security feature seems to be where are we heading.

Here is what a Facebook spokesperson said to Wired about the new security measure in a statement:

The photo test is intended to help us catch suspicious activity at various points of interaction on the site, including creating an account, sending Friend requests, setting up ads payments, and creating or editing ads.

This selfie feature isn’t the first time social media giant has asked users to upload photos of themselves for security purposes. To battle revenge porn, Facebook also asked victims to upload nude photos of themselves as well.

And you thought asking for a selfie was a weird.

This new measure seems to be gaining, even more, speed now as Facebook is dealing with the backlash from Capitol Hill for their super lax monitoring of Russian hackers using their site to push fake news and buy ads.

Photo: Credit: David R.Rico/WENN.com/Screenshot

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