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Rapper Wiz Khalifa has respectfully turned down an offer from Drake to join him on tour.

As previously reported, the Canadian emcee made mention of having the Pittsburgh rapper added to his tour during a live Ustream with fans.

The Taylor Gang head obviously caught word of the bid to join Drizzy’s “Light Dreams And Nightmares” tour and spoke on it in an interview with XXL.

Khalifa, who recently inked a deal with Atlantic, says although he wouldn’t mind “smoking one with him”, he can’t join him on tour because he’s embarking on his tour “The Waken Baken” tour at the same time.

“Just the fact of cuz even extending his hand and me being on his radar is tight, to me…It just lets me know that I’m doin’ what I need to be doin’ as far as stayin’ relevant and stayin’ poppin’. But I think to keep me poppin’ and keep me relevant I gotta stay buildin’ on top of what I’m doin’ and what I been doin’. No disrespect to cuz or anybody else who might wanna see me do some more collaborative things, but to keep buildin’ and keep my brand as strong as what it is, I gotta keep focusin’ on what it is. This is my first tour that I got comin’ up, the Waken Baken tour, I gotta at least kick that off and make that it what it is so we can do ten more…I really want to meet him and chop it up with him…I wanna meet him, chop it up, smoke one with him and who knows what could happen. But it’s all positive right now.”

He also adds that he heard about Drizzy’s #11 spot on Forbes’s list of top Hip-Hop earners. Khalifa says that once he makes the estimated $10 million that Drizzy reportedly made, then he might be worthy of hitting the road with the Young Money all star.

“I’m real happy for Drake and real proud of Drake…I was lookin’ on the Internet and that made $10 million this year. So maybe when I make $10 Million then we can tour. We can do like some special dates or some surprise guest type thing, but I need 10 mil’, too, Drake.”

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