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Vulture Festival: In the Nest 2020 - Day 1

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Aside from spawning countless classic albums, creating music icons, and making the culture a multi-billion dollar business, Hip-Hop’s golden era of the 90’s also produced a gang of rappers turned entrepreneurs who to this day continue to make bank.

One of those Hip-Hop knuckleheads turned professional entertainer is Wu-Tang’s own Method Man who went from ripping mics to, well, everything else. From becoming a respectable actor to having his own podcast on comic books, Johnny Blaze has branched out to other fields of entertainment outside of rap music over the years and has made quite a career for himself outside of the booth. In the latest podcast episode of Spotify’s Jemele Hill Is Unbothered, the Ticalian Stallion opens up about his life’s work from the 90’s up to this point including his role on Power Book II, his new podcast about the Marvel Cinematic Universe (the man has been lobbying to play Bishop in X-Men), and of course, the legacy of the legendary Wu-Tang Clan.

Explaining why he thinks Wu-Tang had the worldwide impact that it did, Method breaks down the science behind the groups popularity and how word of mouth helped propel them to superstardom.

Well, I think a lot of it is attributed to how well received we were by the black community, which always makes others very curious, like what’s going on over there. What’s all the racket. Then when they get their hands on the music and they actually give it a chance, it’s like, Oh, okay, I see it. And those fans not taking anything away from the young is nowadays, but it’s fast food to them. There’s always a new artist, this, that, and the third. But those fans from back then, including our black fans, they held on to that stuff in their soul. So it’s like, they want to, I mean, that music is so relevant to them today that they want to play it for their kids. So their kids have, uh, it’s, it’s them like trying to tell them, this is your music education. This is where you should start at. 

Check out the interview in it’s entirety below and let us know your thoughts on what Method Man had to say.

 

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