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Star Wars The Rise of Skywalker

Source: WENN.com / WENN

John Boyega rightfully gets mentioned as one of the top Black actors of his generation, but there were some assumptions that the top producers and directors in the film industry might be overlooking him due to his outspoken nature. Fans of Boyega will be elated to know that the Nigerian-British actor will grace screens in the upcoming war drive 892, replacing Jonathan Majors presumably due to a scheduling conflict.

In an exclusive report from The Hollywood Reporter, Majors was set to appear as a frazzled Marine veteran returning to civilian life in the Abi Damaris Corbin-directed indie feature. However, Majors couldn’t commit to filming as he’s currently set to appear in the third upcoming film in the Ant-Man franchise alongside Paul Rudd, Evangeline Lilly, Michael Douglas, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Kathryn Newton.

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Jonathan Majors was originally due to star in the project but had to bow out when 892’s shifting start dates came into conflict with Ant-Man 3, which shoots July in London. Shifting start dates is common in indie filmmaking due to revolving financing, which can sometimes cause cast changes.

According to sources, the project had several other actors ready to go and they too left when Majors bowed out. The producers and first time feature director Abi Damaris Corbin were facing the prospect of shuttering down everything but attempted to power through, making a Hail Mary call for a name lead.

As the outlet notes, Boyega became available after leaving the Netflix film Rebel Ridge for what the actor cited as “family reasons” although the perception from many on the set was that Boyega simply walked off never to return.

Majors will make his big splash in the MCU as Kang The Conqueror in Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania. The film is set for a 2023 release as part of the MCU’s Phase Four.

Photo: WENN

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