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A group of Minnesota Lynx players wore some pre-game t-shirts promoting change, justice and accountability. Four police officers responded by leaving their security posts.

The #BlackLivesMatter or #BlueLivesMatter discussion has taken yet another ugly turn.

Monday night at the Target Center in Minneapolis, Minn., a group of WNBA players for the Minnesota Lynx used their profiles to speak up for people being victimized by trigger-happy policing as well as police officers that have been killed in retaliation.

The shirts read “Change Starts With Us” in bold letters, with “Justice & Accountability” underneath that message. The back of the shirt featured the names of Alton Sterling, Philando Castile and shouted out the Dallas Police Department.  At the bottom it had “Black Lives Matter.”

To the human eye, the shirt looks to be calling attention to the hurt on both sides, hoping to unify everyone. But to four off-duty police officers working security at the venue it looked like something worthy of protesting.

That’s why they left their posts at the game, essentially opening the door for more danger to arise, putting the fans who were at the game at risk.

The four officers also removed their names from the list to work at future games. Lt. Bob Kroll, president of the Minneapolis Police Federation said he commended the officers actions. No, you eyes are not playing tricks on you. He said “commend” not “condemn.”

Lynx star Maya Moore explained the shirts saying:

“If we take this time to see that this is a human issue and speak out together, we can greatly decrease fear and create change. Tonight we will be wearing shirts to honor and mourn the losses of precious American citizens and to plead for change in all of us.”

Knoll also says that more officers may not work games as long as the players keep their stance on the issue. Sounds like #NoLivesMatter to these officers.

Photo: Screenshot

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