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Derek Chauvin mugshot

Source: Minnesota Department of Corrections / Minnesota Department of Corrections

The man charged with the murder of George Floyd’s death is already being punished for his actions. Derek Chauvin is now spending 23 hours a day in the box.

As spotted on New York Magazine the disgraced police officer has been hit with some hard time ahead of his formal sentencing. He is currently being held at the Administrative Control Unit (ACU) at the Minnesota Correctional Facility in Oak Park Heights. This facility is holding him for about 96% of his day. The one hour of he is allowed outside of his cell is strictly designated for exercise.

The ACU is the state’s most secure unit,” Sarah Fitzgerald, a spokeswoman for the Minnesota Department of Corrections, told Huffington Post. But the formal response says that his placement isn’t for disciplinary reasons. “Administrative segregation is used when someone’s presence in the general population is a safety concern. It’s unknown how long he will be there.” “This type of restricted housing is not disciplinary in nature,” the official website states. “Sometimes it is used during pending investigations or when continued presence in the general population could pose a particular safety concern.”

Naturally that much time served without social contact can be a mentally exhausting undertaking for any inmate thus the website states the “staff must make visual observations of incarcerated individuals on a pre-determined irregular schedule, at least every 30 minutes”. Additionally a mental health professional must interview each occupant monthly for an assessment. “Staff must immediately notify mental health services if any person requests mental health services or a person exhibits signs of depression, disorientation, or unusual behavior,” the website reads.

Mr. Chauvin is charged with two counts of murder — second-degree unintentional murder and third-degree murder — and the sentencing guidelines for each is 12.5 years for someone with no criminal history. But the maximum sentences for each charge differ: Second-degree murder could be as high as 40 years in prison, while the maximum for third-degree murder is 25 years. His sentencing is scheduled for this summer.

Photo: Minnesota Department of Corrections

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