HipHopWired Featured Video
CLOSE
Rick Ross "Port Of Miami 2" Album Release Celebration

Source: Shareif Ziyadat / Getty

There are rumblings of a beef brewing between assumed allies Meek Mill and Rick Ross, presumably due to label issues. According to rumors, Meek Mill recently had a birthday party in Miami and allegedly denied his Maybach Music Group boss access to his VIP section.

Our cousin folks BOSSIP got the scoop on the supposed beef and shared that there are rumblings that Mill is unhappy with his situation with MMG for reasons unknown to the public.

From BOSSIP:

Last weekend, Meek Mill celebrated his 34th birthday. In addition to sharing the first pictures of his son with his ex Milan, of course, he had to pick up those back ends. Meek had a birthday celebration in Miami in partnership with the world-famous Headliner Market Group at Club LIV. The event went off without a hitch, but shortly after, rumors started circulating that a rapper had a birthday party and didn’t allow entry to his label boss amid the unnamed rapper’s frustration of wanting to be out of his contract. (see video below)

DJ Akademiks was streaming on Twitch and brought up the rumors without saying the names of the artists involved. Anyone who regularly watches his streams knows Meek is the only one whose name he really doesn’t include, mainly because of the fact that they have beef.

The video from Akademiks can be viewed below.

There have been issues at Maybach Music Group in times past with Mill and labelmate Wale getting into on Twitter over what was framed as a lack of support between work colleagues.

Whatever issues exist between Ross and Mill currently haven’t been fully laid out, but it is known that Mill has his own label situation now with Dream Chasers Records and perhaps is looking to break free of the contractual obligations he has to MMG to further his own label and brand.

Twitter had their usual commentary and we’ve got that listed out below.

Photo: Getty

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

MORE FROM HIP-HOP WIRED