The same samples have been flipped by different producers on numerous occasions, some claim that some sample sources shouldn’t be toyed with while others feel that two producers won’t make the same beat out of the materials so why not? When you take a recognizable beat that is deemed an undisputed classic by some and a sacred song by others you aren’t allowed to use said beat then add elements that diminish it. In many cases, you’d receive grief just for rhyming over the original instrumental on a mixtape. In the case of “T.R.O.Y.”, it’s a song that a great deal of us wouldn’t even fathom that someone would touch because it’s a given that you don’t use, rework or attempt to update it. However, if you came up in the post ’97 Internet Age of Hip-Hop then these standards or rules simply don’t work with, or just are not respected, in modern Rap.

“I cannot (and refuse to) respect those that outwardly dismiss the notion that there are, in fact, guidelines, boundaries rules and proper etiquette in Hip-Hop in respect to these issues.” 

Whereas Pete Rock, Grap Luva, 9th Wonder, Kev Brown and many others producers that came up in the same fashion I did in respect to the observance of the supposed rules of Hip-Hop feel this was an affront to the culture, there are others from the same generation that feel that nothing is off limits, but it’s up to the producer and MC to still treat the original song or source material with respect if they chose to take on that task. I can respect that opinion, I cannot (and refuse to) respect those that outwardly dismiss the notion that there are, in fact, guidelines, boundaries rules and proper etiquette in Hip-Hop in respect to these issues. It’s like the old saying goes “Ignorance of the law is no excuse.” It’s just troubling to think that in 2012 we need to explain things that should be long established by now.

In closing, Lupe Fiasco and the dumbass producer of said ill fated song made the following mistakes. First, they used a beat that could possibly be deemed as Hip-Hop sacrilege for using. Secondly, it was too similar to the original iconic production and the changes made to said song tainted what’s regarded as one of the greatest beats ever (which worth noting was disputed for years between Pete & Large Pro as to the discovery of the sample, but that’s a separate issue in of itself). Third, Pete Rock wasn’t previously informed (Lupe says differently) that this song was being made using his beat. Given that it was intended to be a single for Lupe Fiasco’s upcoming album that’s absolutely unforgiveable. Fourth? That Lupe Fiasco himself didn’t know enough or have enough wherewithal to decline rapping over the “T.R.O.Y.” beat in the first place.

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