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Conway The Machine and Funkmaster Flex are a hot topic of current Hip-Hop discussion, this after the Buffalo, N.Y. rapper called out the Hot 97 DJ for his lack of supporting underground acts. Funk Flex responded in kind, sparking a debate about the role of terrestrial radio in the current landscape.

Conway The Machine took to Instagram Live last weekend and expressed frustration over Funk Flex ignoring underground acts while explicitly stating in the video that he doesn’t need the radio support. For some reason, many on Twitter took Conway’s words to be a lament about his position in the game and that wouldn’t even make sense considering the success of Griselda and the rise of Conway’s own Drumwork Music Group label.

Accusing Funk Flex of being a gatekeeper, Conway mentions DJ Suss One who held a gig on the now-defunct The Wendy Williams Show, and shrugging off a fan who mentioned Conway as one of his faves.

Funk Flex replied to Conway in a wordy Instagram post, seemingly ignoring Conway’s call to put on for the up-and-coming and zeroing in on The Machine’s age and ability. The Instagram post can be viewed below.

Flex followed that up with a video clip of him listening to Conway freestyle over Wu-Tang Clan’s “Triumph” with Flex looking over with a muted expression. It isn’t clear what Flex’s intentions are but the so-called “Warm Milk General” isn’t backing down from critique or challenges from anyone.

What is unfortunate is that Conway The Machine made some solid points. As it stands, New York is the birthplace of Hip-Hop so it would figure that DJs who run the airwaves will give shots to those rising in the ranks. Again, an artist of Conway’s stature wouldn’t need the support of Hot 97 or Power 105 but underground Hip-Hop of the sort that Conway and his peers create should be heard beyond DSPs.

Check out some reactions from Twitter below.

Photo: Getty

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