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Celebrity Sightings In Los Angeles - January 25, 2022

Source: Bellocqimages/Bauer-Griffin / Getty

Donald Glover is somebody who pushes the creative envelope on multiple levels, and that extends to who he has on his team in these efforts. And now he’s got another notable name lending an assist—Malia Obama.

In an interview with Vanity Fair, the Atlanta creator and star did confirm that the daughter of former President Barack Obama is now part of the writer’s room for his upcoming unnamed series on Amazon. “She’s just like, an amazingly talented person,” said Glover on the red carpet at the Atlanta season three premiere, which took place at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Los Angeles. “She’s really focused, and she’s working really hard.”

His brother, Stephen Glover, also was in agreement. “Donald always says perspective is important, and people with different perspectives are important for a writer’s room. And for sure, she definitely has a unique perspective on everything,” he said to reporters at the event. “So we wanted to hear her stories and have her work with us. Listening to her stories and having her involved really gave us a lot of good ideas.”

Malia Obama has been hard at work in Hollywood in recent years, interning on HBO’s Girls in 2015 and other productions like Halle Berry’s Extant television series while attending Harvard University, from which she graduated last year. Of course, that didn’t absolve her from catching some good-natured heat in the writer’s room. “Well, you know, we just hurt her feelings. We can’t be easy on her just because she’s the [former] president’s daughter.”, Stephen Glover joked. For Donald, his admiration for the eldest Obama daughter’s work heightens his enjoyment of being in the writers’ room working on this series as well as his time working on Atlanta and others. “The writers’ room is probably my top two favorite parts of the process. We just get to hang out all day, and talk about what makes us laugh.”, he said.

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