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Protesters gather for Sean Reed

Source: Wildstyle Paschall / All317Hiphop

Even amid a pandemic, Black Americans aren’t safe in their own communities, after a police shooting leaves an Indiana community looking for answers.

On Wednesday (May 6), Sean Reed was live-streaming himself on Facebook after apparently taking police on a high-speed chase on the highway. Realizing the error in judgment, the 21-year old pulled over and began asking one of his 4000 viewers to come to pick him up before revealing his location.

“Somebody come get my stupid ass,” Reed said before exiting his vehicle. “Please come get me! Please come get me! Please come get me! I’m on 62nd and Michigan, I just parked. I’m gone.”

It was at that moment that the video goes dark from Reed placing his phone in his waistband and it was from there the horrific shooting can be heard.

A voice can be heard yelling at the man, “Stop! Stop!”

“F*ck you,” Reed is heard replying.

It was then that viewers heard about 11 or 12 gunshots before a brief pause then two more shots were fired. The phone continued to live-stream, facing the blue sky as the opening lyrics of rapper Young Dolph’s “16 Zips” played on the device.

Immediately after the shooting, the live video was still streaming, even after they shot and killed him, unbeknownst to police, capturing officers sharing a laugh over his dead body, not knowing they were still being recorded by the Facebook Live session Reed started before he died.

“Looks like you’re going to have a closed casket, homie,” a police officer is overheard saying on the video.

The triggering event unfolded as Black America was angry over the racist vigilante murder of Ahmoud Arbury who was hunted, shot, and killed by two white men in Georgia who have gone unpunished for two months under the inexplicable pretenses of making a citizen’s arrest.

Despite the sensitivity, footage of Sean Reed’s killing quickly went viral on social media, which we will not be sharing. However, we have captured some of Twitter’s reactions to the tragedy below.

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