twista

Cancel culture has a new target in their sights. Twista was trying to be funny but it seems the jokes on him.

At midnight, promising Virginia singer-rapper D.R.A.M. will deliver his debut album Big Baby D.R.A.M. But that didn’t stop him from liberating “Wifi,” his highly anticipated collaboration with Erykah Badu, a few hours early.

Nicki Minaj has the Internets talking a bit more than usual due her verse on DJ Mustard’s new single “Don’t Hurt Me.”

Twista and a few of his associates faced charges in Indiana after they were nabbed by authorities back in March for possessing a half-ounce of marijuana. It was announced Tuesday that the charges would be dropped after the driver of the vehicle claimed responsibility for possession of the drug. 

With summer just around the corner, a handful of songs are sure to reign supreme throughout the season (Drake’s “One Dance, anyone?), but there’s no clearcut dominant rap record. But in comes Wiz Khalifa with a potential anthem titled “Pull Up,” featuring Lil Uzi Vert.

The Game was quick to hit the booth after hearing of music icon Prince’s untimely passing yesterday (April 21). The product of the studio session is a song aptly titled “Rest In Purple,” featuring songstress Lorine Chia.

A weed bust got in the way of Twista’s business commitments last night (March 24). The Chicago native was arrested on his way to a performance in Indiana.

On August 22, the Chicago Footaction Flagship Store implemented itself on 26-28 State Street to give a city already renown for its keen fashion sense a major boost. Whether you’re a citizen or tourist, a view of the Chicago skyline while purchasing kicks couldn’t heighten the experience that much better.

This edition of Wired Tracks highlights two fresh releases from Detroit rapper Dej Loaf, who returns with two new songs for your listening pleasure.

The news of the Jackie Robinson team being stripped of their Little League World Series title over alleged residential violation is heartbreaking for many. Especially when you consider the desolate conditions in Chicago and the youth having very few opportunities to successfully out of trouble.

The lyrics from Chicago rap group Do or Die‘s 1996 smash debut single “Po Pimp,” featuring Twista, made its way onto a fourth-grader’s homework assignment. The parents of the boy were angered by the vulgar verses and voiced their frustration to a school superintendent and board.

While Twista is fully capable of strapping up and keeping it hardcore with the rest of his Chicago brethren, he’s equally renown for his tracks aimed to rouse his female audience.